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(FLV) Tatanka Tobacco


By: Flavorah (FLV)

Used in 239 recipes at an average of 1.211%.

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41 DIY E-Liquid Recipes found


I was thinking of a butter pecan waffle. Thought I would use the Holy Grail RY4 for it's caramel . . . which led to, "Why not throw a tobacco at this waffle and see if it sticks!" It stuck. Tatanka (nutty, toffee-like tobacco notes) was my first thought, and it seems to settle in nice with all the other flavors. I ran with it . . . a nutty, vanilla, caramel RY4 with a touch of some FLV tobacco and custard . . . all this on top of a pretty decent waffle base. Added a little AP to up the nuttiness.

Loving it right off the shake . . . mixed 60vg/40pg. Enjoy!

1

Reminiscent? To me yes. FLV Tatanka Tobacco what can I say..... At first I was hesitant because I had a bad experience on a tobacco vape early on in my vaping adventure. Sad that I waited years to revisit. I cracked open this concentrate and it was instant remembrance of my pipe and chewing tobacco (redman) days. I paused for a minute to reminisce. Flavorah's website states this and sure as shit its spot on, "Tatanka Tobacco flavoring concentrate formulated from the ground up for vape manufacturing and creating DIY ejuice recipes. Bold and strong like an American Buffalo, Tantanka is the Native Siox word for buffalo. FLV Tatanka is a tobacco with strong caramel, sweet dough, and rich tobacco notes. Low ash, and low on the musty moisture scale, tatanka is like a fresh opened bag of redman chew. Blends well with other tobaccos, or stand alone. " Wow this concentrate is so good to me I can vape as a stand a lone at 1. To keep this simple and keep the greatness of this flavor, it is accented with FW Salted Carmel and FW butter pecan. The salted carmel adds richess to the all ready carmel notes coupled with the butter pecan to bring out the ash. Yummy !!! Great job Flavorah Don't let the percentages fool you!! This is a bold full flavor vape. Enjoy!!!!

A simple aromatic pipe profile here. I wanted this to be smooth, tobacco forward with an accent of maple and a dab of rum. The molasses is added to enhance the rum and give it a little more sweetness. I considered using TFA Brown Sugar but the 'lasses seems to fit better.

It could use a bit more tobacco so I think v4 will have 1.5% of FLV Cured Tobacco in place of the Tatanka, just to see how it works.

Inspired by Fear's Cardinal (a cardinal is a Prince of the Church) crossed with Bigglesworth's Prairie/Grizzly Vapes' Nanner Bear (prairie = the Great Plains). Throw in a little FLV Tatanka Tobacco (tatanka is a Lakota, a Great Plains Native American tribe, word referring to the buffalo) mixed with some creamy, custard, and we have The Prince of the Great Plains.

The Cardinal inspiration - DFS Holy Grail RY4 (4%) and FLV Red Burley (0.5%). The original Cardinal (https://alltheflavors.com/recipes/24962#cardinal_by_fear . . . which is outstanding) was 8% Holy Grail RY4 and 0.75% Red Burley with 0.25% FLV Kentucky Blend. I cut the Holy Grail in half to make room for DK Tobacco from Prairie . . . lowered Red Burley to 0.5% and switched Kentucky Blend out with Tatanka (bumping the percentage up to 0.5%) Tatanka really adds to the nutty, caramel vibe, which steers this even father away from a tobacco and more towards a dessert.

The Prairie/Nanner Bear inspiration - /u/project_twenty5oh1's Nanner Bear clone, which became Prairie (see edit below) was a revelation when I first tried it. So earthy and different from most of the other commercial juices I'd tried (with the exception of Grizzly's Nanner Bear). I subbed out TFA Peanut Butter in favor of TFA Toasted Almond (1%) for the nutty aspect of Prairie. I kept TFA Banana Cream and Banana Nut Bread but dropped them to 1% each (as opposed to the original percentages 5 and 3, respectively). The flavor that really sets Prairie (and I assume Nanner Bear not knowing the recipe) apart is TFA DK Tobacco Base. It's odd and earthy but not necessarily what I think of when I think of tobacco. However, it is delicious nonetheless and necessary, in my opinion. I dropped it from 6% to 3% to make room for the Holy Grail RY4.

Because this is a dessert, I wanted to wrap it all up with a custard. I went with CC Devon Cream (1%) and INW Custard (1.5%) to smooth out the base of the custard. The TFA Banana Cream also plays nice with the custards/creams. INW Custard is an instantly vapable custard, but I'm intersted to see how/if this changes with a steep.

With that being said, I mixed up a 10mL tester of this at 60vg40pg and have plowed through about half of the bottle dripping it in my Hadaly clone . . . so it is definitely a SNV. It checks all of the boxes I was hoping for: a creamy, nutty caramel custard with notes of banana and the earthiness of tobacco floating around in it. When I finish this bottle, I plan on throwing some FA Polar Blast at it and, possibly, a drop or two of Axiom's Icicles to complete that ode to Bigglesworth/Grizzly Vapes. I think it will play well with the caramel aspect based on how much I loved BDY's K2, a Canadian juice that was a caramel-vanilla tobacco with a kiss of icy menthol. I'll also mix up a larger batch of this recipe by itself and see how it steeps, as this tester will not see tomorrow. I will update when I figure it all out.

Edit - try this url for twenty5oh1's original post: https://www.reddit.com/r/DIY_eJuice/comments/2luk9u/project_twenty5oh1s_nannerpolar_bear_clone_xpost/

This one was created from two of my creations : Shaded Cuban With A Nut + Sweet Vanilla Pecan Tobacco V2.. minus a few flavors, adding FA marshamllow and FLV tatanka tobacco to this. Only time will tell if this was a great move to make.. I'll give this one 21 days before trying it but will wait longer.

Always looking for a good tobacco with chocolate and coffee to back it up with you get a black and mild chocolate and coffee with a tad of a fig/raisin on the exhale very nice to come home to after a Saturday of working and just chill

Cool and creamy chocolate tobacco!

My spin on an Ande's Mint and tobacco cross. The chocolate is noticeable after you taste the creme de menthe. The chocolate melds with the tobaccos and, which are all slightly darker. The wood spice, I added because I had the odd idea to combine wood spice with chocolate. I was looking for a "smoke" or wood hint to it, instead of a nutty feel. I think it turned out pretty well. I enjoyed this thoroughly.

This flavor is inspired by one of the most glorious things in the existence of aromas, in my opinion . . . old books. What I’m not trying to do: create a vape that tastes like an old book. What I’m trying to do: create a flavor based on the findings of what aromas make up the smell of old books. Scientists have studied the volatile organic compounds (VOC) that combine to create the aromas that people associate with old books. This is intended to be a mélange of those aromas that has tobacco as its foundation with supporting notes from the other aromas.

The following are articles I read dedicated to the fabled old book smell.

From the New York Times Op-Ed page: Some scents add monetary value as well as historical interest. A dictionary owned by Mark Twain still had a distinct aroma of tobacco in its pages. Twain, of course, was an incessant smoker of cigars and pipes. Source: https://www.nytimes.com/2017/03/27/opinion/the-smell-of-old-books.html

From Mental Floss: A combination of grassy notes with a tang of acids and a hint of vanilla over an underlying mustiness” is how an international team of chemists describes the unique odor of old books in a study. Source: http://mentalfloss.com/article/31235/what-causes-old-book-smell#sthash.oyAVEY1V.dpuf

From IFLScience: Compound Chemistry reports that hints of almond are created by benzaldehyde, while vanillin emits notes of vanilla. Sweet smells come from toluene and ethyl benzene, and 2-ethyl hexanol produces a light floral fragrance. Additionally, the book can also retain some odors it has been exposed to during its history, such as smoke, water damage, or pressed flowers between the pages. Source: http://www.iflscience.com/chemistry/where-does-smell-old-books-come/

From Popular Science: The fact that the participants named chocolate wasn’t surprising to the researchers, though the frequency that they identified chocolate and coffee with eau de book was.
“You tend to use familiar associations to describe smells when they are unlabeled,” Bembibre says. “And also, the VOC's of chocolate and coffee seem to be very similar to that of books. But it was still surprising to see that reference come up again and again.”
Bembibre also tested what people thought of the smell of the library at St. Paul’s Cathedral, London, where the researchers gathered many VOC samples. The smells recorded there were as a whole described by participants as woody and smoky more than chocolatey, probably because they were able to see the magnificent wooden surroundings. The library was chosen for a reason; the smell in that library is so famed that it often gets mentioned in guest books, and the curator insists that any conservation methods must preserve the distinct smell. Source: http://www.popsci.com/old-book-smell#page-6

It is with these descriptions that I begin my journey (June 28th, 2017).

Tobacco – I’m going with a mix of FLV Red Burley and FLV Tatanka 2% and 1% respectively
Almond – FA Almond 0.5%
Vanilla – The papacy of vanillas, DIYFS Holy Vanilla 1.5%
Chocolate – JF Milk Chocolate 0.6%
Coffee – FA Up 0.5%
Wood – FA Oak Wood 0.4%
My addition based on personal experience: Fruity/muskiness - FA Fig Fresh 0.5%

This still very much a work in progress. It is delightful as a shake and vape, but I'm eager to see how this changes given a little time to unfold. As this progresses and/or changes, I will add more extensive flavor notes . . . at the time of this writing, I am early in the process (day 2).

Update (July 2nd, 2017):

Addition - added FLV Connecticut Shade at 0.5% . . . it brings in some coffee/cocoa notes and just a hint of leather. It feels like the perfect bookend (don't excuse the pun) to close out this recipe. I think this is now near completion.

Mixed up a 30mL of A Good Book at a ratio of 60vg to 40pg and loaded it in a tank that is somewhere between a very restricted lung hit and MTL.

Updated again ( July 29th, 2017):

A slightly altered version of A Good Book. I dropped the FA Up (will probably try out HS Hazelnut Coffee in it's place if I can find it in stock) . . . Connecticut Shade brings in some subtle coffee notes on its own. Bumped up the Tatanka just a bit, as well as FLV Fig (which I replaced FA Fig Fresh with bumping the percentage up at the same time). I dropped FA Oakwood for TPA Red Oak. This is a slightly higher percentage mix, and it steeps amazingly. This is just a slightly bolder version of the original . . . but I'm proud of both of them.

Personally, I mix these 60/40 and put them in an EVL Reaper MTL/restricted lung hit, and I'm thoroughly satisfied by them. I tested them at 70/30 in a Hadaly Clone . . . and thoroughly enjoyed it that way as well.

1

This flavor is inspired by one of the most glorious things in the existence of aromas, in my opinion . . . old books. What I’m not trying to do: create a vape that tastes like an old book. What I’m trying to do: create a flavor based on the findings of what aromas make up the smell of old books. Scientists have studied the volatile organic compounds (VOC) that combine to create the aromas that people associate with old books. This is intended to be a mélange of those aromas that has tobacco as its foundation with supporting notes from the other aromas.

The following are articles I read dedicated to the fabled old book smell.

From the New York Times Op-Ed page: Some scents add monetary value as well as historical interest. A dictionary owned by Mark Twain still had a distinct aroma of tobacco in its pages. Twain, of course, was an incessant smoker of cigars and pipes. Source: https://www.nytimes.com/2017/03/27/opinion/the-smell-of-old-books.html

From Mental Floss: A combination of grassy notes with a tang of acids and a hint of vanilla over an underlying mustiness” is how an international team of chemists describes the unique odor of old books in a study. Source: http://mentalfloss.com/article/31235/what-causes-old-book-smell#sthash.oyAVEY1V.dpuf

From IFLScience: Compound Chemistry reports that hints of almond are created by benzaldehyde, while vanillin emits notes of vanilla. Sweet smells come from toluene and ethyl benzene, and 2-ethyl hexanol produces a light floral fragrance. Additionally, the book can also retain some odors it has been exposed to during its history, such as smoke, water damage, or pressed flowers between the pages. Source: http://www.iflscience.com/chemistry/where-does-smell-old-books-come/

From Popular Science: The fact that the participants named chocolate wasn’t surprising to the researchers, though the frequency that they identified chocolate and coffee with eau de book was.
“You tend to use familiar associations to describe smells when they are unlabeled,” Bembibre says. “And also, the VOC's of chocolate and coffee seem to be very similar to that of books. But it was still surprising to see that reference come up again and again.”
Bembibre also tested what people thought of the smell of the library at St. Paul’s Cathedral, London, where the researchers gathered many VOC samples. The smells recorded there were as a whole described by participants as woody and smoky more than chocolatey, probably because they were able to see the magnificent wooden surroundings. The library was chosen for a reason; the smell in that library is so famed that it often gets mentioned in guest books, and the curator insists that any conservation methods must preserve the distinct smell. Source: http://www.popsci.com/old-book-smell#page-6

It is with these descriptions that I begin my journey (June 28th, 2017).

Tobacco – I’m going with a mix of FLV Red Burley and FLV Tatanka 2% and 1% respectively
Almond – FA Almond 0.5%
Vanilla – The papacy of vanillas, DIYFS Holy Vanilla 1.5%
Chocolate – JF Milk Chocolate 0.6%
Coffee – FA Up 0.5%
Wood – FA Oak Wood 0.4%
My addition based on personal experience: Fruity/muskiness - FA Fig Fresh 0.5%

This still very much a work in progress. It is delightful as a shake and vape, but I'm eager to see how this changes given a little time to unfold. As this progresses and/or changes, I will add more extensive flavor notes . . . at the time of this writing, I am early in the process (day 2).

Update (July 2nd, 2017):

Addition - added FLV Connecticut Shade at 0.5% . . . it brings in some coffee/cocoa notes and just a hint of leather. It feels like the perfect bookend (don't excuse the pun) to close out this recipe. I think this is now near completion.

Mixed up a 30mL of A Good Book at a ratio of 60vg to 40pg and loaded it in a tank that is somewhere between a very restricted lung hit and MTL.

6

I single flavor tested FLV Smore in various percentages and all I could think of was damn this is all the enticing flavor notes I need to pair with a classic southern tobacco blend. But it wasn't all the notes I needed for this one.

The name? I have no clue, vaping a few iterations of this in a hotel on a business trip I just thought it needed this name :)

The combo of Red Burley and Cured is a natural one for me. They just seem to perfectly complement each other. Cured keeps Red Burley from getting too far into "Nutty Land" and Red Burley keeps cured out of the "Generic Tobacco Park" Both are excellent tobacco concentrates. I threw Tatanka in on a whim "AND IT JUST WORKS" so no magic here. I will be chucking some Tatanka in a few things going forward, another great concentrate. (If you are unlucky enough to not have Tatanka, FLV Native works really well here at 1% I just liked the Tatanka version a bit better.

The dessert notes, I really wanted this to be more of a tobacco vape with nuance notes in the back ground. I get carried away and tend to make them RICH. This is a test of my restraint in balancing a tobacco dessert profile as opposed to my usual DESSERT tobacco profiles.

FLV Smore - I really wanted this one to play here and bring a little of the toasted marshmallow and dark chocolate notes it has in. I get an indistinct creamy texture with this concentrate. It may be my broken taste buds, it may be everyone's WHO CARES, it just works here. I do not get much if any graham cracker with this concentrate. It may be that you have to take it up higher than I am brave enough to with this concentrate. The chocolate here gets to be a bit strong above 1.5% and I absolutely despise chocolate vapes.

FLV Toffee and FLV Caramel, using here to bring some more sweet to this this, some more brown, some more rich to tame this tobacco profile a bit more so that more people than me can enjoy it. Using the Toffee of course for the "Murcan" toffee note that it has and the Caramel to bring the sweet and brown up a notch. Also using these two to cut the chocolate note a bit so I can enjoy this, if you missed it, I hate chocolate vapes.

Steep times, most of you sometimes tobacco vapers are gonna want to let this sit for a week to tame those tobaccos some and let the other notes come in to play a bit more. If you are like me and enjoy that bold fresh in yo face tobacco that FLV has when fresh are gonna want to mix larger and SnV then enjoy on a steep.

VG, I truly believe that tobacco vapes are best at 60%VG or 50% VG, some will call poo on that so do as you please :) (this is good at 70% VG)

Flavor Notes