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(FA) Oak Wood


By: FlavourArt (FA) - Buy Direct
Buy From: bcv ecigexpress

Used in 502 recipes at an average of 1.02%.

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43 DIY E-Liquid Recipes found


1

This is basically a Tobacco remix of Castle Long. I took out anything vanilla, and added some tobaccos. It's rich and complex. It needs a couple weeks to mix, but I could tell right off the bat that it was a keeper. After an over night steep, I mixed up 60 ml to let it sit for at least a month because I'm thinking that's where it's really going to shine.

5

A nice, light tobacco leaf vape. The Native has a little bite to it, but it's not too in your face. This was originally created to be a base for an aromatic blend with some fruity stuff on top, but I preferred it all by itself. If you want to play around with some toppers, just throw a little of whatever on top. I can't think of anything this wouldn't blend well with.

5

Wet and juicy apricot tobacco. Just enough tobacco to add a bit of smoky feel on the exhale. The apricot sits right up front though. If you're in to fruits, this could be a bit of a dirty break from all that sweetness. If you're in to dirty tobaccos, this could be a break from all that filthy ash. A little something for everyone.

2

This flavor is inspired by one of the most glorious things in the existence of aromas, in my opinion . . . old books. What I’m not trying to do: create a vape that tastes like an old book. What I’m trying to do: create a flavor based on the findings of what aromas make up the smell of old books. Scientists have studied the volatile organic compounds (VOC) that combine to create the aromas that people associate with old books. This is intended to be a mélange of those aromas that has tobacco as its foundation with supporting notes from the other aromas.

The following are articles I read dedicated to the fabled old book smell.

From the New York Times Op-Ed page: Some scents add monetary value as well as historical interest. A dictionary owned by Mark Twain still had a distinct aroma of tobacco in its pages. Twain, of course, was an incessant smoker of cigars and pipes. Source: https://www.nytimes.com/2017/03/27/opinion/the-smell-of-old-books.html

From Mental Floss: A combination of grassy notes with a tang of acids and a hint of vanilla over an underlying mustiness” is how an international team of chemists describes the unique odor of old books in a study. Source: http://mentalfloss.com/article/31235/what-causes-old-book-smell#sthash.oyAVEY1V.dpuf

From IFLScience: Compound Chemistry reports that hints of almond are created by benzaldehyde, while vanillin emits notes of vanilla. Sweet smells come from toluene and ethyl benzene, and 2-ethyl hexanol produces a light floral fragrance. Additionally, the book can also retain some odors it has been exposed to during its history, such as smoke, water damage, or pressed flowers between the pages. Source: http://www.iflscience.com/chemistry/where-does-smell-old-books-come/

From Popular Science: The fact that the participants named chocolate wasn’t surprising to the researchers, though the frequency that they identified chocolate and coffee with eau de book was.
“You tend to use familiar associations to describe smells when they are unlabeled,” Bembibre says. “And also, the VOC's of chocolate and coffee seem to be very similar to that of books. But it was still surprising to see that reference come up again and again.”
Bembibre also tested what people thought of the smell of the library at St. Paul’s Cathedral, London, where the researchers gathered many VOC samples. The smells recorded there were as a whole described by participants as woody and smoky more than chocolatey, probably because they were able to see the magnificent wooden surroundings. The library was chosen for a reason; the smell in that library is so famed that it often gets mentioned in guest books, and the curator insists that any conservation methods must preserve the distinct smell. Source: http://www.popsci.com/old-book-smell#page-6

It is with these descriptions that I begin my journey (June 28th, 2017).

Tobacco – I’m going with a mix of FLV Red Burley and FLV Tatanka 2% and 1% respectively
Almond – FA Almond 0.5%
Vanilla – The papacy of vanillas, DIYFS Holy Vanilla 1.5%
Chocolate – JF Milk Chocolate 0.6%
Coffee – FA Up 0.5%
Wood – FA Oak Wood 0.4%
My addition based on personal experience: Fruity/muskiness - FA Fig Fresh 0.5%

This still very much a work in progress. It is delightful as a shake and vape, but I'm eager to see how this changes given a little time to unfold. As this progresses and/or changes, I will add more extensive flavor notes . . . at the time of this writing, I am early in the process (day 2).

Update (July 2nd, 2017):

Addition - added FLV Connecticut Shade at 0.5% . . . it brings in some coffee/cocoa notes and just a hint of leather. It feels like the perfect bookend (don't excuse the pun) to close out this recipe. I think this is now near completion.

Mixed up a 30mL of A Good Book at a ratio of 60vg to 40pg and loaded it in a tank that is somewhere between a very restricted lung hit and MTL.

2

This is my favorite tobacco recipe last year. It’s a “grown up” tobacco so the sweet notes take a back seat to a smooth strong tobacco, with woody type highlights, and a sweet whiskey base.

Starting in at 7% FA Soho this mild RY4 type is lightly sweet and ultra smooth. With some delicate caramel and vanilla backnotes, with a rich and smooth tobacco forward flavor this is a perfect base to build our relaxing “seat by the fire” type of tobacco vape.

TFA Kentucky Bourbon at 2.5% and FA Whiskey at .75% gives us a deep, boozey whiskey base. Sweet, but not too sweet. It is supported by the sweeter notes in FA Soho and Oba Oba.

FA Oakwood at 1% leaves a deep cedar, woody note. A touch on the dry side, it’s counteracted by the creamy notes in FA Soho and FA Oba Oba.

FA Oba Oba at 2%. My secret weapon in bold tobaccos. Not creamy per se, and really more similar to marshmallow candy. Being sort of generically fruity and non invasive it gives our tobacco and whiskey base some more body and dense mouthfeel, floating our tobacco in a thick mouthfeel that’s creamy without having any dairy tones.

A dash of MTS Vape Wizard goes a long way to smooth over any stray harsh notes from tobacco and whiskey, but it isn’t super necessary. The vape will still be smooth without it if you don’t have it.

2

I've been playing with this recipe for about 6 months, and I've finally got it tasting like I envisioned. It becomes a rather luxurious vape after a minimum 3 week steep. After that, it really showcases the rich taste of INW for pipe flavors. If you're a tobacco head, plan on making double what you're already considering, as you'll notice it goes quick,

If you don't have the original version of INW Gold Ducat, Gold for Pipe is a decent sub, however if you have something smokier and less sweet, give it a try at the same percentage.

So, I wanted this to be tobacco forward, and I ended up bringing the Black for Pipe a LOT from where I originally had it. The for pipe combo here really sets the tone of the mix. I also had originally used Gold for Pipe, but decided Ducat made it a little smokier and dirtier. Gold for Pipe was almost too sweet for the tobacco profile I wanted. FA Oakwood added another level of depth to the already dark and rich tobacco with it's subtle woodsy notes.

The custard part had always been CAP VC, but no matter the percentage, it just needed something else. That's where CAP Butter Cream came in. It was neutral tasting enough, and gave the custard base a bit more volume.

3

So, in light of DiyOrDie Remix month, I figured I could release one that I came up with. This is the first tobacco that I really enjoyed. It got me started on my huge love for tobacco's, especially FLV tobaccos.

I was given this by a shop owner and she enjoyed it as well, she wanted me to try and work with it and see if I could come up with something similar.

"Harking back to lush lowlands mellowed by the mists of the Appalachian mountains, Golden Tennessee delivers a taste of light air-cured burley tobacco, with sweet maple and deep oak notes."

So, I looked around and tried several burleys, including a canadian burley. I wanted to see if the maple in it worked. None of these came close to me, except INW. I wanted FLV, but after a few months I realized it just wasn't it. Oak wood was a pretty easy one to go with. The oak blends with the tobacco very well, gives a great oak taste. Maple was a little tougher. I went through a few maples, and when I opened FA Maple Syrup, i knew it was the right one. I played around with mixing it and this is where I came. The maple seems high, but it falls into a bottom note after steep. The smell of the mix, when you open the bottle, and the vapor after pull is heavier maple aroma. The taste is a smooth burley, with a maple undertone, and oak. This is a very simple recipe to me, but I enjoy this and figured I would throw it out there for others.

1

Ever had a rocky patel cigar by Drew Estates well I believe you will like this one. It needs 3-4 weeks steep but was really good as an S&V

1

Smooth earthy whiskey followed by warm vanilla cream.

TFA kentucky bourbon/FA whisky/FA oak wood - The two liquiors mix together well though both tend to fade, the oak wood is here to get them to hold their flavor longer while adding a subtle smokey note.
FLV cream/HS French vanilla ice cream/TFA toasted marshmallow/FW butterscotch ripple - the cream and French vanilla ice cream combine for a nice heavy cream for the whiskey to sit on. The toasted marshmallow and butterscotch ripple add to the body and mouthfeel, keeping it thick through the exhale.
FA maple syrup/FA torrone/INW shisha vanilla - the maple syrup flavor is barely detectable, which surprised me at 1% but it adds not only sweetness but richness as well. The torrone lends a hand to the texture and shisha vanilla is strong enough to fall in line behind the whiskey but not be overtaken by the creams.

This doesn't need long to sit, tastes fine right after mixing though the whiskey will mellow after a few days as the creams develop.

1

Just had Starbucks smoked butterscotch latte and thought I could make it better as of a vape.

Oakwood- slightly Smoky Woody flavoring Fantastic Four adding just a hint of smoke to the butterscotch along with boosting that butterscotch flavor.

Irish Cream- just the perfect cream for this recipe, very creamy and sweet Bailey's type flavoring just melds perfectly you with all of the other flavorings

Dulce de leche- if you follow me you know that I am in love with this flavor not only do you get a fantastic caramel note, it is also super dense and creamy.

Butterscotch- because she can't have smoked butterscotch without butterscotch 😜😜😜

Flavor Notes